Master Formula Metal Gloss Review – Polish Your Beer Keg?

Have you seen the guy in a booth at motorcycle and cars shows polishing a beer keg to a chrome-like shine? He also brings soda cans to a brilliant luster, and has been doing so for years.

Naturally, I wanted to give the Master Formula Metal Gloss a try, but I knew that polishing a blemish-free can may be easier than, say, the lower fork legs on my 35-year old Gold Wing. So I decided to see how it fared.

Metal Gloss is a viscous liquid as opposed to a paste. Give it a good shake and work it in with a dry terry towel. As I suspected, the product is not a wipe-on and wipe-off miracle – but it is very good. Years of oxidation and minor pitting from typical road detritus had left the aluminum fork legs with a gray, pitted patina that was impervious to most polishes I had tried, including Semichrome.

The application took some time by hand. Perhaps if I had used some type of polishing machine the task would have been less onerous and more effective, but it did work. The final result was not chrome-like but, still, quite shiny. I was satisfied with the result, versus the effort and cost, and it really didn’t take that much work. Each application of polish and elbow grease left lots of black oxidized aluminum on the cloth.

Once the polishing was completed I used Master Formula Sealer Gloss. On previous occasions, when polishing aluminum, I would put a coat of wax over the freshly polished areas to reduce the rate of oxidation and help keep the shine. Sealer Gloss does the same job of keeping oxygen away from the shiny bits, but better.

Given the time and cost factor I was quite pleased with the results. No tools or machinery were required but for a good terry rag and, I’d bet, an electric buffing wheel would had improved the results greatly. That’s a review for another day when I get my hands on a buffing machine.

Metal Polish, 12 oz: MSRP $25
Sealer Gloss, 12 oz: MSRP $25

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