Gear / Parts Alpinestars Crank Denim Jeans Review: Ready for Anything

Alpinestars Crank Denim Jeans Review: Ready for Anything

Alpinestars Crank Denim Motorcycle Jeans | Street and Dirt Tested

When my off-road motorcycle career started, Levi’s 501s were not so much my pants of choice as they were my pants of necessity. They gave way to leather riding pants, and then to the modern nylon-based materials you see used for dirt bike riding pants these days.

So, wearing Alpinestars Crank Denim jeans when test riding the new Ducati Scrambler Desert Sled through the Tabernas Desert was something of a return to fashion form for me.

While the Alpinestars Crank Denim jeans are part of the Italian company’s City Collection, they felt confident enough in the durability of the jeans to send them to me knowing that I’d be riding off-road in a rocky Spanish desert.

Alpinestars Crank Denim Jeans Test Off-Road
Alpinestars Crank Denim Jeans Review

Fortunately, the Crank jeans were up to the challenge. With Kevlar lining in the slide areas and CE-approved knee protection—though I was longing for my Alpinestars Fluid Tech Carbon knee braces—I wasn’t too worried about a fall, either on- or off-road. I did manage to avoid a pavement get-off, but off-road my enthusiasm did get the best of me. The Crank jeans came away unscathed, though crusted with dust.

Given that the Alpinestars Crank Denim jeans could survive a desert sledding experience, I wasn’t surprised that they work just great as around-town riding pants. The Italian fit agrees with my body, and they aren’t embarrassingly low-rise (who needs plumber’s crack), as can be the trend these days. First and foremost, they are riding pants.

Those CE knee guards are flexible, though not sloppily so. That gives them a good feel against the knee when properly adjusted, and I didn’t have any desire to remove them for comfort’s sake. Hip pads are included, but they aren’t CE-approved, so I removed them.

Plenty of panels in the fairly ergonomically cut legs, along with elastane for a bit of stretch, make it possible to move around on the bike without feeling restricted. Although I try to resist the temptation to go for hard rides in technical jeans, the Crank Denim pants do seem to encourage that choice.

Alpinestars Crank Denim Jeans
Alpinestars Crank Denim Jeans Review

The Alpinestars Crank’s YKK fly zipper is robust, and aided by a button closure at the top and belt loops for my Levi’s leather belt. The front pockets are deep, so you can safely carry your home keys or other precious cargo in them. There’s also a small watch pocket on the right side, as is traditional with serious jeans.

I haven’t kept anything in the rear pockets when riding since I lost a wallet in high school, and the back pockets on the Crank motorcycle jeans are definitely for walking only despite being fairly large.

All of the pockets come with pre-worn exterior edges, as do the leg openings, which is definitely a fad these days. Personally, I prefer to earn the patina in my jeans, rather than buy it.

Branding is subtle, courtesy of a grey patch on the back right of the belt line featuring the A’stars logo. While these aren’t jeans you’re likely to want to walk around in on a non-riding day, you won’t feel awkward wearing the Alpinestars Crank Denim jeans when you are walking around at a stop.

Proven to be rugged, protective, and comfortable, the Alpinestars Crank Denim jeans are outstanding motorcycle pants in a wide variety of conditions.

Alpinestars Crank Denim Jeans Fast Facts

  • Sizes: 28-40
  • Color: Greaser Dirty; Dark Rinse
  • Made in Tunisia
  • Alpinestars Crank Denim Jeans Price: $250 MSRP

Alpinestars Crank Denim Jeans Review | Photo Gallery

Don Williams
Don Williamshttp://www.ultimatemotorcycling.com
With 50 years of riding experience, Don Williams is a fan of all kinds of motorcycles. He enjoys sport bikes, cruisers, dirt bikes, touring bikes, adventure bikes, dual sport bikes, and rideable customs. Ask Don what his favorite bike is and he will tell you, "Whatever bike I'm on."

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