Bob Price Dies Following Crash at Isle of Man TT Supersport 1 Race

Bob Price Dies Following Crash at Isle of Man TT Supersport 1 Race

Bob Price, who died following a crash at the 2014 Supersport TT

Bob Price Isle of Man TT Crash

Tragedy once again struck at the Isle of Man TT races during Tuesday’s Monster Energy Supersport 1 race.

The Auto Cycle Union (ACU) reports that Bob Price, 65, of Stroud, Gloucester, died following a crash at Ballaugh on the third lap of the Supersport 1 TT. Price’s death is currently under investigation.

This marks the 241th death to date in both TT and Manx Grand Prix races on the Snaefell Mountain Course since racing begin on the Island in 1911.

Price, an automobile body repair shop owner, first competed at the TT in 1992. He was also a regular competitor in the Manx Grand Prix and Classic races held on the island.

His top finishes on the Mountain Course was second in the Manx Grand Prix (MGP) Senior Classic in 2002. He also took third in that year’s MGP Junior Classic in 2002. Price also took third in the 2004 MGP Junior Classic, and participated in last season’s inaugural Classic TT races. He was piloting a Yamaha YZF-R6 during the deadly crash.

This marks the fifth death since the 2011 Isle of Man TT.

The first fatal crash of 2011 occurred during practice for the Sidecar race. The ACU reported that Bill Currie, 67, of Ellesmere Port, and his passenger Kevin Morgan, 59, of Shrewsbury, were killed during the IOMTT sidecar crash at Ballacrye in the north part of the Mountain Course.

The third rider to perish on the Mountain Course in 2011 was Derek Brien, 34, of Co. Meath in Ireland. Brien was killed during the IOMTT crash in the first Supersport race. The ACU reported that the fatal, one-man IOMTT crash occurred during a high-speed section at Gorse Lea.

There were no deaths in 2012, and one in 2013 when Yoshinari Matsushita, 43, of Japan, was killed following a crash at Ballacrye in the north section of the Isle of Man.

Price’s death was the 18th at the Isle of Man TT event since the turn of the century.

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