Motorcycle Racing News Aprilia upgrades 2010 Shiver 750

Aprilia upgrades 2010 Shiver 750

Motorcyle Preview

Already a stunning naked sport bike, Aprilia has upgraded the Shiver 750 for 2010, making it, according to Aprilia, “more racing spirit, more aggressive, more ergonomic.”

Changes to the Aprilia Shiver 750’s ergonomics include a new, two-inch narrower seat, a more-protective fairing, a race-inspired riding position, new footpegs that are farther rearward and handlebars with a flatter bend.

According to Aprilia, “It is a bike which can seduce even the most demanding rider, but it is also able to bring on those who are new to the two-wheeled scene, as it is so amazingly easy to ride.”

Returning is the 90-degree V-twin Aprilia powerplant with four valves per cylinder, double overhead camshaft and liquid cooling (maximum output: 95 hp at 9,000 rpm), Ride-by-Wire technology with three powerband maps, modular trellis/aluminium frame with significant torsional rigidity, braced aluminium swingarm, laid-down rear shock (5.1 inches of travel) and 43 mm upside down fork (4.7 inches of travel).

New are Wave discs with radial calipers, 320mm discs and steel-braided lines, plus a 5.5-inch wide 17-inch rear wheel. ABS is optional.

The 2010 Shiver 750 uses the multi-map integral Ride-by-Wire technology that has been developed even through the racing experience gained with the RSV4 in World Superbike with Max Biaggi aboard.

With the simple touch of the starter button, and on-the-fly, the rider can select one of the three maps, and radically change the motorcycle’s character.

> Sport is available for the most aggressive riders.

> Touring can be selected when smoother power delivery and fluidity are essential.

> Rain offers maximum safety when traction is limited.

2010 Aprilia Shiver 750 | Motorcycle Specifications

Engine

type

Aprilia V90 four-stroke longitudinal 90° V-twin engine, liquid cooled, double

overhead camshaft with mixed gear/chain timing system, four valves per

cylinder.

Bore

and stroke

92

x 56.4 mm

Total

engine capacity

750cc

Compression

ratio

11:1

Max

power at crankshaft

95

hp at 9,000 rpm

Fuel

system

Ride

by Wire integrated engine control system.

Ignition

Digital

electronic ignition integrated with injection system.

Start

up

Electric

Exhaust

system

2-into-1

exhaust system in 100% stainless steel with three-way catalytic converter and

lambda probe

Lubrication

Wet

sump

Gearbox

6

speeds

Clutch

Multiplate

wet clutch, hydraulically operated

Primary

drive

Straight

cut gears, drive ratio: 60/31 (1.75)

Secondary

drive

Chain.

Drive ratio: 16/44

Chassis

Modular

tubular steel frame fastened to aluminium side plates by high strength bolts.

Removable rear subframe.

Front

suspension

Upside

down fork with 43mm stanchions. Wheel travel: 4.7 inches.

Rear

suspension

Aluminium

alloy swingarm with swingarm brace.

Hydraulic

shock absorber with adjustable rebound and preload. Wheel travel: 5.1 inches

Brakes

Front:

Dual 320 mm Wave stainless steel floating discs. Radial calipers with four

pistons. Steel-braided brake line. Optional 2-channel Continental ABS system

 

Rear:

Wave stainless steel240mm

disc. Twin piston caliper, with steel braided brake line.

Wheel

rims

Aluminum

alloy

Front:   3.50 X 17″  Rear:  5.5 x 17″

Tires

Radial

tubeless tires;

Front:    120/70 ZR 17 

Rear:  180/55 ZR 17

Dimensions

Max.

length: 89.1 inches

Max.

width: 39.9 inches (at handlebar)

Max.

height: 44.7 inches (at instrument panel)

Seat

height: 31.5 inches

Wheelbase:

56.7 inches

Trail:

4.3 inches

Steering

angle: 25.7 degrees

Tank

4

gallons

Ron Lieback
Ron Lieback
One of the few moto journalists based on the East Coast, Ron Lieback joined the motorcycle industry as a freelancer in 2007, and is currently Online Editor at Ultimate Motorcycling. He is also the author of "365 to Vision: Modern Writer's Guide (How to Produce More Quality Writing in Less Time).

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