Valentino Rossi Enduro Crash Update

Shortly after being hospitalized Thursday for breaking his right leg during a enduro training crash, Valentino Rossi underwent successful surgery.

Movistar Yamaha MotoGP says surgeons at the Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti’ in Ancona, Italy, were able insert pins into Rossi’s right tibia and fibula, both bones that were fractured during the enduro accident near Rossi’s home in Tavullia, Italy.

Yamaha MotoGP says the surgery took place between 2 – 3 a.m. Friday morning. Dr. Raffaele Pascarella, Director of the Orthopedics and Traumatology Division, inserted a metal pin – a locked intramedullary nail – without any complications.

Valentino Rossi Enduro Crash Update
Valentino Rossi Enduro Crash Update: Surgery a Success!
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Further medical updates will follow.

“The surgery went well,” says Valentino Rossi, who chases a 10th World Title. “This morning, when I woke up, I felt already good. I would like to thank the staff of the Ospedali Riuniti in Ancona, and in particular Doctor Pascarella who operated on me. I’m very sorry for the incident. Now I want to be back on my bike as soon as possible. I will do my best to make it happen!”

Though not confirmed, the injury will keep Rossi sidelined September 8-10 during the San Marino Grand Prix at Misano World Circuit Marco Simoncelli Circuit, a home race for the 38-year-old Italian.

The news arrives after Rossi made history last week at Silverstone by becoming the only rider in GP history to achieve 300 premier-class starts. Rossi finished fourth at the British Grand Prix.

So far this season Rossi achieved four podiums, including a win at Assen. With six rounds remaining, VR46 is fourth in points with 157, 26 behind points leader Ducati Team’s Andrea Dovizioso.

Rossi also suffered a motocross-training injury ahead of Mugello, and complained of pain in his stomach and chest. Regardless, Rossi raced and finished fourth.

Rossi’s last fracture was during the 2010 Italian Grand Prix at Mugello; he missed six weeks of racing that year.